Review: Curtain Call (Short Stories From Antaloor)

A traveling theater company and an actor with a dark secret. This explosive mixture meets the scheming aristocratic world in New Ashos – and misfortune takes its course.

Review: The Fork, the Witch, and the Worm: Eragon

It’s been a year since Eragon departed Alagaësia in search of the perfect home to train a new generation of Dragon Riders.

Now he is struggling with an endless sea of tasks: constructing a vast dragonhold, wrangling with suppliers, guarding dragon eggs and dealing with belligerent Urgals and haughty elves. Then a vision from the Eldunarí, unexpected visitors and an exciting Urgal legend offer a much-needed distraction and a new perspective.

This volume features three original stories set in Alagaësia, interspersed with scenes from Eragon’s own unfolding adventure. Included is an excerpt from the memoir of the unforgettable witch and fortune-teller Angela the herbalist, penned by Angela Paolini, the inspiration for the character, herself!

Relish the incomparable imagination of Christopher Paolini in this thrilling new collection of stories based in the world of the Inheritance Cycle.

Review: Summer Frost (Forward collection)

A video game developer becomes obsessed with a willful character in her new project, in a mind-bending exploration of what it means to be human by the New York Times bestselling author of Recursion.

Maxine was made to do one thing: die. Except the minor non-player character in the world Riley is building makes her own impossible decision—veering wildly off course and exploring the boundaries of the map. When the curious Riley extracts her code for closer examination, an emotional relationship develops between them. Soon Riley has all new plans for her spontaneous AI, including bringing Max into the real world. But what if Max has real-world plans of her own?

Blake Crouch’s Summer Frost is part of Forward, a collection of six stories of the near and far future from out-of-this-world authors. Each piece can be read or listened to in a single thought-provoking sitting.

Review: Ark (Forward collection)

On the eve of Earth’s destruction, a young scientist discovers something too precious to lose, in a story of cataclysm and hope by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Divergent trilogy.

It’s only two weeks before an asteroid turns home to dust. Though most of Earth has already been evacuated, it’s Samantha’s job to catalog plant samples for the survivors’ unknowable journey beyond. Preparing to stay behind and watch the world end, she makes a final human connection.

As certain doom hurtles nearer, the unexpected and beautiful potential for the future begins to flower.

Veronica Roth’s Ark is part of Forward, a collection of six stories of the near and far future from out-of-this-world authors. Each piece can be read or listened to in a single thought-provoking sitting.

Review: The Names of the Dead

They locked him up. Now he’s out–for revenge.

Former CIA officer James ‘Wes’ Wesley paid the ultimate price for his patriotism when he was locked up in a French jail for an anti-terror operation gone wrong–abandoned by the Agency he served, shunned by his colleagues and friends, cut off from his family.

Now he is shattered by the news that his ex-wife, Rachel, a State Department analyst, has been killed in a terrorist attack in Spain. He also discovers that his young son, Ethan, is missing. But Wes didn’t know he had a son–until now.

Why was Rachel in Spain? And why did she keep his son secret from him?

Granted early release, Wes takes flight across Europe to search for the truth and exact his revenge. But can he catch the spies who betrayed him before they track him down? In order to find the answers and save his son, Wes realises he must confront the dark secrets in his own past–before it’s too late.

Review: Blood in the Water : A True Story of Small-Town Revenge

A brutal murder in a small Nova Scotia fishing community raises urgent questions of right and wrong, and even the nature of good and evil, in this masterfully told true story.

Blood in the Water offers a dramatic narrative set in a unique, lovingly drawn setting, where a story about one small community has universal resonance and raises a disturbing question: Are there times when taking the law into your own hands is not only understandable but the responsible thing to do?

This is a story not about lobster, but about the grand themes of power and law, security and self-respect.

In June 2013, three upstanding citizens of a small town on Cape Breton Island murdered their neighbor, Phillip Boudreau, at sea.

While out checking their lobster traps, two Landry cousins and skipper Dwayne Samson saw Boudreau in his boat, the Midnight Slider, about to vandalize their lobster traps. Like so many times before, the small-time criminal was about to cost them thousands of dollars out of their seasonal livelihood.

Boudreau seemed invincible, a miscreant who would plague the village forever. Meanwhile the police and local officials were frustrated, cowed, and hobbled by shrinking budgets.

One man took out a rifle and fired four shots at Boudreau and his boat.

Was the Boudreau killing cold blooded murder, a direct reaction to credible threats, or the tragic result of local officials lacking the resources and authority to protect the community? As many local people have said, if those fellows hadn’t killed him, someone else would have.

Review: Rescuing Titanic: A true story of quiet bravery in the North Atlantic

Rescuing Titanic tells with exquisite illustrations and richly detailed text the story of the Carpathia and its heroic journey rescuing passengers from the Titanic.

This exquisitely illustrated story of quiet bravery tells in rich detail how the little ship Carpathia saved 705 passengers of the Titanic from the icy waters of the North Atlantic.

With the approaching 110-year anniversary of the ship’s sinking, Rescuing Titanic shares a unique connection with the story of the ship; having been written and illustrated by debut Northern Irish artist, Flora Delargy, whose grandfather and great grandfather both worked in the Belfast Shipyards where the Titanic was built.

Review+: Minion: Special Huntress Edition, The Awakening & Audiobooks

Minion: Special Huntress Edition, The Awakening.

All Damali Richards ever wanted to do was create music and bring it to the people. Now she is a Spoken Word artist and the top act for Warriors of Light Records. But come nightfall, she hunts vampires and demons—predators that people tend to dismiss as myth or fantasy. But Damali and her Guardian team cannot afford such delusions, especially now, when a group of rogue vampires have been killing the artists of Warriors of Light and their rival, Blood Music. Strange attacks have also erupted within the club drug-trafficking network and drawn the attention of the police. These killings are a bit out of the ordinary, even for vampires. No neat puncture marks in the neck to show where the life’s blood has been sucked from the body. These bodies have been mutilated beyond recognition, indicating a blood lust and thirst for destruction that surpasses any Damali has encountered before. Damali soon discovers that behind these brutal murders is the most powerful vampire she has ever met, and this seductive beast is coming for her next. But his unholy intentions have also drawn the focus of other hellish dark forces. Soon Damali finds herself being pulled deeper into the vast and horrifying vampire world.

Review: Sharing Violet: A Steamy Student-Teacher Relationship Story

Imagine me, single, middle-aged and content, spending my days teaching English Literature at a university in Southern California. I had created a perfect life for myself, and had every reasonable expectation that it would go on forever. And then Violet showed up.

I’m Violet’s first love. She’s my last.

The stories in this volume are an explicit account of the sex adventures we have had during our first ten years together. They are stories about The Lifestyle, about sex clubs and swinging, about sensual excess and experimentation, about multi-partner and anonymous sexual encounters. More than anything, they are stories that expose my intoxicating and shameful need to see Violet’s beautiful young body handled, pleasured and penetrated by strangers. I have always been deeply aroused when somebody else gives Violet her orgasm – and when she gives theirs to them.

Because I’m an English teacher and a bodybuilder, these stories are peppered with reflections on the body, on fitness and conditioning, and on literature. I catch myself reporting on the politics of couple swaps on the dance floor, and brooding over Tolkien and Saint Augustine in the middle of three-way sex.

These stories also involve another kind of Sharing Violet. We have shared these sexual experiences with each other, and they have for the most part involved sharing her body with other lovers, men and women.

Now, we’re sharing them with you.

Review: The Man on the Mountaintop

dapted from Susan Trott’s best-selling novels, The Holy Man and The Holy Man’s Journey, The Man on the Mountaintop tells the story of Holy Man Joe, a humble and unassuming 72-year-old man who lives in a hermitage at the top of a mountain. Thousands of hopefuls line the single-file path leading to his door, seeking his wisdom. The pilgrims bring a multitude of modern-day problems, sorrows, and grievances. From the arrogant and wealthy man intent on cheating his way to the front of the line to the alcoholic who gradually builds the physical and mental strength needed to quit his addiction, The Man on the Mountaintop is an uplifting parable full of life lessons, powerfully told with compassion, wit, and humor.

Reviews © Copyright 2022 Korra Baskerville